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Apple Leaf Curling Midge (Dasineura mali)

Monday Apr 26, 2021

ALCM Adults on trap
ALCM characteristic rolling on leaves
ALCM larvae white stage
ALCM trap captures in one Okanagan orchard (2020)

Apple Leaf Curling Midge (Dasineura mali) 

Why is it a problem?
Apple leaf curling midge (ALCM) is a newly recognized pest or apple orchards in the Okanagan. Also known as Apple Leaf Gall Midge, or Apple Leaf Midge, this tiny insect is mostly a problem in young apple orchards and rootstock nurseries, due to its ability to limit the developing trees growth. Adult midges are a small mosquito-like fly, which lay their eggs onto the edges of leaves and roll the leaf edges into a characteristic purple-hued fold. Developing ALCM larvae will first appear as white, and then turn a bright orange later in development. Since the majority of damage from this pest is associated with rapidly developing leaf tissue, this pest is less of a concern in mature, established apple orchards.
 
Where does Apple Leaf Curling Midge come from?
ALCM adults lay their eggs in the spring, with signs of their leaf rolling becoming evident in the orchard typically after petal fall. There is thought to be 2-3 generations of ALCM per year. Research is ongoing.
 
 
Still interested in finding out more? Check out our BC DAS Apple Leaf Curling Midge video on YouTube to connect horticultural knowledge from the field with the online DAS program: